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spooooky interiors, anyone? [Jul. 27th, 2005|08:40 pm]
extremehomes

ngakmafaery
[mood |awake]

The building itself does not appear to be The Main Event, but I would call some of the decorating fit for 'extreme homes'...

http://www.darkneedles.com/Decorating/homedeco.htm
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house with the right priorities... [Jun. 22nd, 2005|06:34 pm]
extremehomes

ngakmafaery
[mood |awake]

http://www.catshouse.com/html/cathouse/ch_01.htm
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(no subject) [May. 22nd, 2005|08:19 am]
extremehomes

foolfaerie420
[mood |high*mmm hmmm*]
[music |mix-Tom Jones "Kiss"(prince cover)]

Hi! Introducing myself.

I live in Humboldt county california and I am a second-generation back to the land person. I live on 5 acres with my daughter in a seperate house from my dad. I am at the stage that many of you are moving towards, living in the country with a small house, surrounded by gardens, interwoven with community and family.more about my situationCollapse )
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singapore skyscraper guys making an effort... [Apr. 22nd, 2005|08:19 pm]
extremehomes

ngakmafaery
http://www.trhamzahyeang.com/project/skyscrapers/edit-tower01.html
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AWESOME. [Apr. 4th, 2005|03:16 pm]
extremehomes

theohara

I just found out from my roommate that the Earthship community in Taos (for anyone unfamiliar with Earthships, they're super-cheap, super-energy-efficient, pretty-much-all-around-super homes built out of old tires, bottles, etc. covered with earth) has managed to modify the basic Earthship design into a BioDiesel refinery.

They get cast-off vegetable oil and waste from local restaurants, use wind and solar power to refine it, and produce clean-burning, superefficient BioDiesel (it's so clean you can drink it, but it runs in an unmodified diesel engine).  The byproducts?  The little bit of carbon dioxide that was in the plants (which they feed back to more plants), pure fat, pure glycerin, a little bit of nitrous oxide, and a pleasing, cooking-french-fry smell.  They make soap with the fat and glycerin.

The resulting BioDiesel is so much cheaper than the imported stuff that truck drivers are coming in from out of town to buy it... and since locals are switching to diesel cars in order to utilize this new resource, the whole town is beginning to run on locally produced oil.  Which means that the fossil fuels normally used to transport fuel to them aren't being used either.

It's a vastly less wasteful, vastly less polluting, vastly cheaper system.

Anyway, it brought a smile to my face, and I thought it might do the same for those who are looking into more energy-efficient fuel systems for their homes.

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*points to self* newbie. [Mar. 25th, 2005|06:34 pm]
extremehomes

toshfraggle
I've had theohara friended for awhile for fanfiction, but just managed to find out about this community today (Yeah I'm a little dense, but I usually don't have this much free browsing time either so shhhh!).
Anyway, Bill and I are planning to design and build a house together sometime in the future. He's got a condo, so it's probably a number of years away (seeing as I still haven't moved out of my place and all, lol, and all that other nifty coupling required by society junk has to happen first) but essentially, we both really like the thought of designing a unique house and for the most part what we want matches up so hey, why not? (I'm currently pretty feverish so don't mind me if I ramble.)
He likes Frank Lloyd Wright and Esher, I like Chayan Khoi. He's an engineer, I'm a Communications and Design chickie. We're both looking for something unusual, homey, and most especially not like every other house that is being built here (Detroit area).
For the most part, every new neighborhood and condo around here looks exactly alike inside. We want something personal, with a lot of wood grain. We've talked about a circular main room with a large fireplace, or maybe something even more oddly shaped with lots of little arches, gables, and towers. I insist on a balcony over some water, and eventually would love one of these in the backyard or something like it: http://www.freespiritspheres.com/index.htm
Until moving back with my parents, I lived in a small mining town come University town that had a *lot* of charm in nearly all its buildings (they were original from the 1800s and some from the early 1900s). These houses had had lots of additions, would have completely original woodwork and furniture in some cases, and were really amazing places to live (plus I got to live on a canal and wake up to water every day, which is important). At the very least, I'd like to build something long standing, unique, cozy, and more welcoming than the traditional yuppie fare--and he agrees, so someday we may actually get to do it.
Anyway, I figured I'd stick around here for ideas and research and commenting. A lot of the links I've looked at that have been posted here are really fascinating.
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a witty effort... [Mar. 25th, 2005|04:57 pm]
extremehomes

ngakmafaery
[mood |awake]

http://www.livejournal.com/users/zestyping/97476.html
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visual dictionaries are fun [Mar. 19th, 2005|04:46 pm]
extremehomes
snk1414
thought you might enjoy some diagramsCollapse )
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Cobbing Over Traditional Construction? [Mar. 6th, 2005|12:53 am]
extremehomes

theohara
Howdy, folks.

After years of planning cob homes, treehouses, earth-covered hobbit holes... my mom inherited my grandmother's house and has 'given' me the house I grew up in -- a rancher in the suburbs.

The thing is, the house is in complete shambles.  Several years ago, Mom hired a contractor to turn the house into something very unique and awesome, but he turned out to be a con man who left my Mom flat broke, horribly depressed, and living in a half-finished house.

It has two roofs -- a much higher partial new one and the original one -- both of which leak.  Con Man graded the yard wrong, and water pours into the basement; the leaking roofs have rotted floors all over the house, and the addition is so rotted that you have to walk on the floor joists or you'll fall through.  Worse, my thirty-seven-year-old manchild brother moved home with his two enormous omnivore hunting dogs, (Mom already had six cats) who have eaten huge holes in anything made of fabric, carpet, or wood and used the rest as a toilet.  Everything that was taken out of the rooms that were being renovated and/or supposed to go into the new addition is piled in enormous, filthy heaps all over the house.  It is a wreck... it was so horrible that Mom sort of went into denial about it.  I'd say she hasn't cleaned the house in five years, and since large portions of the house are open to the elements -- plus the eight animals -- well, it's not pleasant.

Since I have major building/repairs to do and a nearly nonexistent budget, I was hoping to use a lot of the techniques I've learned from my obsession with natural building... but the house is in the middle of a freakin' subdivision.  Worse, that subdivision just-barely falls under the jurisdiction of a nearby, extremely wealthy community with strict building codes.  I'm lucky (I guess that depends on the definition of the word) that the Con Man made sure that the front of the house looked finished before he scarpered off to parts unknown (he had the balls to take pictures of it and use them as advertisements).  So from the front, it just looks like a normal little boring house... it's only in the back that the work needs to be done.

I was thinking about possibly cobbing over (and around, and through...) the existing structure.  The plywood has all rotted and would need to be removed, but the frame still seems strong; it's questionable whether Con Man actually built the thing to code, (I really don't want to call a building inspector to check, for fear he'll condemn the house) and I think I'd sleep better at night knowing that what Con Man built isn't what's really holding the house up.

Theoretically -- and I don't have the practical experience to back this up, which is why I'm asking you guys -- I don't see why I couldn't pull the plywood and cob around the existing wooden frame and concrete-block foundation, especially since I have to remove vast amounts of dirt from the backyard anyway to fix the leaking basement problem.  I know that wood needs space to expand and contract, but I'm not sure what that would mean in terms of cobbing around it.

The finished exterior of the house is wood paneling, and I was thinking I could make it match the back and give the house more interest by using cob like you would use stucco around the rest of the house once I was done with the back... but again, I don't know if this is workable.

Does anyone have any experience in cobbing over a wood frame and/or getting away with non-standard construction in a residential area?  Would I be better off just sucking up and finishing the house with standard construction tactics?
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a modern bard lived here... [Mar. 5th, 2005|09:06 pm]
extremehomes

ngakmafaery
[mood |awake]

http://www.annwfn.org/index.cfm?PageID=126&CategoryID=44

...and the site looks quite interesting, if not as extreme as chocolate...
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